Tag Archives: amazon

If You Gotta Have A Kindle, Get Free 2-Day Shipping

Amazon Kindle Fire

Amazon.com, Inc. today announced free two-day shipping for the Kindle family, Amazon’s most gifted, most wished for, and bestselling products, for delivery before Christmas. Customers who order by 8 pm PT on December 21 will receive their Kindle in time for Christmas with free 2 day shipping to any address in the continental U.S. As the holiday approaches, customers still looking for the perfect gift can order the $79 Kindle at http://www.amazon.com/kindle, the $99 Kindle Touch at http://www.amazon.com/kindletouch, the $149 Kindle Touch 3G at http://www.amazon.com/kindletouch3G, and the $199 Kindle Fire at http://www.amazon.com/kindlefire.

via Amazon Media Room: Press Releases.

Hey Kids, Be Careful Clicking Your Kindle!

Amazon’s Kindle Fire tablet, one of the hottest gadgets this holiday season because of its low price, has some parents bristling over the simplicity at which children can order from the retail giant and the inability to stop them without crippling the device.

Another concern is over theft or losing the device, which can be then easily be accessed for purchases unless a user sets a password to lock the screen when it’s not in use.

What happens is that when you order a Kindle Fire – which differs from the Kindle reader by allowing users to browse the web, play games, video and music – it comes with your Amazon account information preloaded, along with “1-Click” ordering. That means anyone who is holding that device can place an order, whether it’s their account or not. No prompts come up to confirm the purchase or ask for a password.

So that means that the itchy fingers of toddlers can click way, including the 3-year-old daughter of Scenic Labs founder Jason Rosenfeld. He says his daughter was using the device and clicked on an image of a children’s product that appeared on the screen because it was in his shopping history — he had browsed the item while holiday shopping on his PC.

Source: Yahoo!

The Return Of The Catalog Showroom Compliments Of Amazon

Today Amazon Will Give You  To Use PriceCheck and Screw Local Retailers | TechCrunch

Today only, Amazon has got a pretty good deal lined up. Use the PriceCheck mobile app and get 5% off your purchase, up to $5 at a time, as many as 3 times. Amazon wants you to start using retail stores as more of a catalog showroom. A store where you can look, touch, and sometimes even try an item you are interested in, then order it. In a traditional catalog showroom, you place the order at the store, and then your item is shipped out to you. Some catalog showrooms have actual in-house inventory that they keep in the back. You go to an order desk and then in a few minutes, your item is available for in-store pickup. The Amazon model is a little different. They want you to go to a local retailer, use the PriceCheck app, and order on Amazon, which they hope offers a better deal. Retailers like Best Buy are already used to customers pulling out their mobile phones and scanning in the stores. There are QR codes next to many items they sell. The difference is that the QR code supplies you with more information about the product, and Best Buy hopes this will help make a sale. However, the Amazon PriceCheck app is meant to scan a UPC, or as some people know it, a “barcode”. In order to scan the UPC barcode, you must find a retail box or packaging and scan the code. Yes, just like your local Target, Wal-mart, or grocery store.

If enough people start scanning barcodes with apps like this, then how long will it be until retailers like Best Buy start keeping all their inventory in the back, except for a “floor model”. They already do this with TV’s, computers, and home theater receivers. Have you ever tried to scan a UPC barcode on one of those items? You can’t! There is no retail box to scan! They’re in the “back”! When will they start doing the same thing to mobile phone cases, video games, and DVD’s? But the Amazon App can also use images and voice. How do you combat this? With exclusive in-store model numbers and retail signs that block enough of the item that the app cannot recognize it. Perhaps a bright yellow and black “sale” sign taped across an item? Hey, that would probably work! Retailers like Best Buy want a buffer between you and your Amazon PriceCheck app. In a twist of fate, this could actually revive the catalog showroom. O.K. maybe not. But as far as price comparison apps, this could be the real game changer. Better prices for consumers? You bet. One final thought. The local Best Buy location where KidFriday shops was previously a catalog showroom. What goes around, comes around.

Thinking Of Getting A Kindle Fire? You Might Want To Think Again

Kindle Fire

Amazon.com’s new Kindle Fire offers a disappointingly poor user experience. Using the web with the Silk browser is clunky and error-prone. Reading downloaded magazines is not much better. Still, user testing with the Fire did help us understand what the new generation of 7-inch tablets is good for: Are they more like 10-inch tablets (e.g., the iPad) or more like 3.5-inch mobile phones? To give away the conclusion, the answer is: “a bit of both.”

via Kindle Fire Usability Findings (Jakob Nielsen’s Alertbox).

Thinking Of Getting A Kindle Fire? You Might Want To Think Again

Kindle Fire

Amazon.com’s new Kindle Fire offers a disappointingly poor user experience. Using the web with the Silk browser is clunky and error-prone. Reading downloaded magazines is not much better. Still, user testing with the Fire did help us understand what the new generation of 7-inch tablets is good for: Are they more like 10-inch tablets (e.g., the iPad) or more like 3.5-inch mobile phones? To give away the conclusion, the answer is: “a bit of both.”

via Kindle Fire Usability Findings (Jakob Nielsen’s Alertbox).